How to Plan and Design an Ayurvedic Wellness Spa

Published: 11th November 2011
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With the present-day lifestyle getting hectic and busier by the day, one thing that is getting scarce is perhaps the availability of time for oneself, one's family or for ones wellbeing. This scenario is not only scary but also dangerous as it spells disaster for a physically and mentally healthy body in you. This realization has given birth to a profitable business niche globally - The Wellness Business. Today world over wellness centers are doing thriving business. While there are no authentic figures available, conservative estimates hint at a whopping figure of $ 250 billion as the size of this market, and still counting.

Global competition in the wellness industry has given rise to a number of wellness styles and therapies to emerge. The latest fad seems to be the traditional Indian system of Ayurveda. While there are a number of well-planned Ayurvedic wellness centers in India and especially in its birthplace Kerala, what is interesting to note is that a strong demand in this therapy is generating a keen interest from luxury hospitality industry. You can today find Ayurvedic wellness centers in luxury hotels and resort spa's globally.

The science of Ayurveda is founded on the principle that the universe is composed of five elements that is air, fire, water, earth and space (ether). All these elements are represented in us by three energies called the "doshas", namely the Vata, Pitta and Kapha. When any of the energy exceeds its established proportion in the body, the balance of elements gets disturbed and, the body loses its balance. Every human being has a distinct ratio and our wellness depends on maintaining this crucial balance. The science of Ayurvedic therapy helps maintain this energy or dosha balance.

Planning an Ayurvedic wellness center is a complex task. It not only requires in-depth knowledge of the science of Ayurveda, but also of the science of Vastu for best results. The therapy is very individual centric and therefore needs very close attention. A well-planned Ayurvedic wellness center therefore has three essential sections.

Consulting

Since the therapy is extremely individual centric, it requires a firsthand knowledge of one's body through individual consulting by an expert Ayurvedic practitioner. A well-equipped room is therefore required to sit with the wellness seeker to evaluate his or her energy levels and suggest wellness remedies.

Therapy Rooms

A number of therapy rooms are provided, the number depends on the demand and results of market survey. There are different types of therapies and therefore the furnishings of rooms differ depending on the therapy offered. A typical treatment room will however have a single piece wooden tabletop called the "Adoni" to give Ayurvedic massage therapy. Each room also has its own private steam box connected to a central steam generator. The rooms also have their own attached private bath or shower rooms.

Yoga/meditation/workout room

Since Ayurvedic wellness believes in physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the body, a good Ayurvedic wellness center is also provided with an area where a wellness seeker can perform prescribed yoga exercises or practice meditation for a defined period for the therapy to give its full results.

An Ayurvedic wellness center or better called Ayurvedic spa has to take care of two more factors that are essential. Firstly, it must have qualified and trained therapists on the one hand and therapy consultants on the other. The second element is the therapy medium or various herbal and medicinal oils, powders, and aromas used for massages, baths and body packs. Some of the best Ayurvedic spas are architecturally laid in a manner that the interior seems to brush the nature. Creation of traditional ambiance assumes great importance in the overall personality of the spa.

Wellness by itself is a thriving and financially lucrative business. Ayurvedic spa business is even more lucrative as it offers "preventive" and "curative" therapies attracting both healthy people wanting to get healthier and not so healthy wanting to get-well. However, it is best to concentrate on the preventive aspect of therapies in a spa than to embrace curative aspect also. Doing so would result in the "Spa" character of the facility being diluted. For someone wanting to become part this billion-dollar business, my advice would be that he or she should take professional services of an expert consultant to ensure starting on a technologically sound and financially viable footing.

You have permission to publish this article without any change what so ever electronically, in print, in your e-book, or on your web site, free of charge, as long as the author by-lines are included.

Ram Gupta is a management professional with specialisation in hospitality, real estate, product and e-marketing. He has over four decades of experience in Asia, Far East, Middle East and Europe. Currently he is an independent consultant in the Industry. His web site can be viewed at http://www.bcgglobal.com and he could be contacted at ramgupta@bcgglobal.com



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